1. Employer Reporting of COVID-positive Employee(s):  https://nmgov.force.com/rapidresponse/s/

 

  1. NM Free COVID testing locations:   https://cvprovider.nmhealth.org/directory.html

 

  1. Families First Coronavirus Response Act: Employee Paid Leave Rightshttps://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/pandemic/ffcra-employee-paid-leave

 

  1. NM COVID containment policies:

 

What is the Difference Between Self-Isolation and Self-Quarantine?

 

  • Isolate if you are sick or test positive for COVID-19
  • Quarantine if you are at risk of having been exposed or have had close contact with someone with COVID-19

 

 

What does it Mean to Be in “Close Contact” with Someone with COVID-19 Who is in their “Infectious Period”?

Close contact” means spending 3 minutes or longer within 6 feet of someone who is confirmed to have COVID-19 when that person was in their infectious period. Wearing a mask or cloth-face covering does not affect the definition for close contact.1

An “infectious period” of a disease is the time during which an infected person is contagious and most likely to spread disease to others.

 For people with symptoms, the infectious period begins 2 days before the person experiences symptoms and extends 10 days after the onset of symptoms, provided that there has been no fever for at least 24 hours without using fever-reducing medicines, and symptoms have resolved or improved. For people with “severe” COVID-19 illness – those who have been hospitalized in an intensive care unit with or without mechanical ventilation – or people with severe immunosuppression2, the infectious period extends 20 days after the onset of symptoms.

 

• For people who never have symptoms, the infectious period begins 2 days before their test specimen was collected and extends 10 days after the specimen collection date.

 

When Should Close Contacts Be Tested?

Close contacts without symptoms are encouraged to get tested for COVID-19. In this case, testing should be performed no sooner than 3 days and ideally 7-10 days after the last date of exposure to someone who tested positive.

If testing is performed on close contacts without symptoms who will be released from quarantine to high-risk settings (e.g., general population of a corrections facility or long-term care facility), then testing should ideally be performed at the end of the quarantine period.

 

Note: Testing during the quarantine period does not end the quarantine period. The full quarantine period should be followed because a negative result does not mean that the contact will not become infectious later in their quarantine period.

 

 

WHEN DOES SOMEONE RECOVER FROM COVID-19 AND STOP SELF-ISOLATION?

Because some people with COVID-19 experience symptoms and some do not, there are different ways for determining whether someone has recovered from COVID-19 and is no longer contagious.

The symptom-based method should be used when someone had COVID-19 symptoms, even if those symptoms develop after the person tests positive for COVID-19.

The time-based method should be used when someone never developed symptoms.

 

 

Ending Self-Isolation if You Had COVID-19 Symptoms

If you had symptoms but did not have severe illness or severe immunosuppression, you may end your self-isolation after:

• At least 1 day (24 hours) has passed without a fever (and without the use of fever-reducing medications) and your symptoms have improved; AND,

• At least 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared.

• If you had severe COVID-19 illness – you were hospitalized in an intensive care unit with or without mechanical ventilation (“severe illness”) – or have severe immunosuppression3 you may end your self-isolation after:

• At least 1 day (24 hours) has passed without a fever (and without the use of fever-reducing medications) and your symptoms have improved; AND,

• At least 20 days have passed since symptoms first appeared.

 

When Should Close Contacts Be Tested?

Close contacts without symptoms are encouraged to get tested for COVID-19. In this case, testing should be performed no sooner than 3 days and ideally 7-10 days after the last date of exposure to someone who tested positive.

If testing is performed on close contacts without symptoms who will be released from quarantine to high-risk settings (e.g., general population of a corrections facility or long-term care facility), then testing should ideally be performed at the end of the quarantine period.

Note: Testing during the quarantine period does not end the quarantine period. The full quarantine period should be followed because a negative result does not mean that the contact will not become infectious later in their quarantine period.

 

 

Quarantine: Close Contact with a Confirmed COVID-19 Case in an Essential Business Setting

If a person has close contact with a confirmed COVID-19 case(s) during their infectious period in a workplace that is considered an essential business, as defined by the NMDOH public health order, the preference and best practice is to quarantine for 14 days from the last exposure to the case. A negative test result does not end the quarantine period.

If an essential business will be forced to cease operations due to the quarantine of close contacts, then close contacts of a case at an essential business may be allowed to return to work as long as they test negative following the exposure and are pre-screened for fever and symptoms daily, regularly monitored, wear a face mask, and maintain at least 6 feet distance from others while in the workplace. Such workers should maintain full quarantine outside of work during the quarantine period. Exemption from home quarantine must be approved by NMDOH or other state regulatory authority.

 

 

Quarantine: Close Contact with a Confirmed COVID-19 Case in a Non-Essential Business Setting

When a person has close contact with a confirmed COVID-19 case during the case’s infectious period in a workplace considered a non-essential business, that person should quarantine for 14 days from the last exposure to the case regardless of a negative test result.

 

 

Charles Lacy-Martinez, MPH

NM Department of Environment

Occupational Health and Safety (NMOSHA)

Charles.Lacy-Martin@state.nm.us

(505) 490-0953